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Arras People Project Management Newsletter

Greetings!

In this month's newsletter we review the current project management marketplace in terms of salaries and rates. This time last year we released salary data so thought it would be a good time to get an update on that and see what's been happening in 2011.

We have two articles focused on salaries and rates - the first shows where the project management marketplace is at this moment in time - have we seen any improvements, changes or areas of interest? John Thorpe takes us through the stats and details.

John also brings us a new and interesting view on salaries and rates - is there a correlation between the accreditations a project professional has and their earning power? Read on for this new insight.

Finally we bring news of the PPM Census 2012 which will be distributed to project management professionals nationwide in the next few weeks. If you want to be informed about the project management marketplace heading into 2012 we urge you to take part next month.

 

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Salaries and Day Rates Review for PPM Practitioners

Words: John Thorpe

Twelve months on from our last Salaries and Day Rates Review for Project Management Personnel we have the opportunity to dip back into the data collected as part of the Arras People registration process to see some up to-date information regarding salaries and day rates.

The data in this section analyses the registration detail collected during the past 12 months, providing analysis for:

  • Project Managers
  • Programme Managers
  • PMO Managers and Support staff
     

Project Managers

PM Salary Comparison

Project Manager - Salaries

As we can see in the graph above (Figure 1), we have been able to capture and present three elements of data for the registered candidates who are looking for a permanent role.

The first line of data (blue) plots the data collected for the 2011 PMBR (Project Management Benchmark Report) mapping the current salary of project management practitioners at the end of 2010. This provides a reference point for the registration data collected.

The second plot line (gold) shows the distribution of current salary of the candidates registering for project management roles, which we have been banded to allow comparison. This plot, as it did last year, reveals a distribution of candidates earning slightly less than the population who responded to the PMBR with an average salary of £39,618, which in turn is down from £41,000 for registered candidates this time last year.

The third plot line (red) shows the desired salary which the registering candidates indicated they would like to achieve in their next roles. This plot can be analysed in three sub-groups; Firstly the candidates who are looking to achieve salary growth up to £40K which would align them to the PMBR distribution. The second group are those in the £40K to £60K band who are looking to increase their salary; moving from 35% (Current) through 40% (PMBR) to 44% (Desired) in this band. Above the £60K salary we have a pretty consistent picture which accounts for 10% of the project management practitioners in each of the plots.

Project Manager – Day Rates

As we can see in Figure 2 above, we have been able to capture and present three elements of data for the registered candidates who are looking for a contract role. For the purpose of consistent analysis we have excluded those looking to move into a contracting from permanent employment and unemployment.

The first line of data (blue) plots the data collected for the 2011 PMBR (Project Management Benchmark Report) mapping the current day rate of project management practitioners at the end of 2010. As we can see there are 5 groupings in this data set against which we can reference the collected registration data.

The second plot line (gold) shows the distribution of current / last day rate of the candidates registering for contract project management roles. On first look the data is once again banding in a similar pattern to the PMBR schema, though the volumes are higher towards the lower day rates. A further drill down into the actual day rates produced average day rates for each of the 5 groupings of £200, £360, £490, £580 and £875 which provide a direct correlation to the PMBR peaks.

The third plot line (red) shows the desired day rate at which the registering candidates indicated they would consider an offer of a contract. When this data is analysed further it would appear to formulate around a single point, namely £450 per day. Those candidates currently earning below this figure are still looking to push up their rates, some quite aggressively, hence the front loading on the graph. Candidates currently (or previously) earning at this rate are looking for parity in their next role, whilst those who have been earning at the higher levels are on the whole willing to accept significant day rate reductions in order to secure a contract. This of course does not mean that there are no contractors earning the higher day rates, but it is indicative of the tough market conditions in which the contractors have been operating for some time now; the results of this year's PMBR will paint a clearer picture on actual rates achieved by contractors during 2011.


Programme Managers

Programme Manager - Salaries

Figure 3

The first line of data (blue) in Figure 3, above, plots the data collected for the 2011 PMBR (Project Management Benchmark Report) mapping the current salary of programme management practitioners at the end of 2010. This provides a reference point for the registration data collected.

The second plot line (gold) shows the distribution of current salary of the candidates registering for programme management roles, which we have been banded to allow comparison. Interestingly, the plot of current salary for job seekers does not double peak as the PMBR data does, but instead builds to a peak around the £60K level of remuneration. This plot reveals a distribution of candidates earning slightly less than the population who were registered last year with an average salary of £59,840, which is down from £61,113.

The third plot line (red) shows the desired salary which the registering candidates indicated they would like to achieve in their next roles. Across the board we can see a desire to push salary levels higher.
 

Programme Manager – Day Rates

Figure 4

As we can see in the graph above (Figure 4), the first line of data (blue) plots the data collected for the 2011 PMBR (Project Management Benchmark Report) mapping the current day rate of programme management practitioners at the end of 2010. As we can see there are three groupings in this data set against which we can reference the collected registration data.

The second plot line (gold) shows the distribution of current / last day rate of the candidates registering for contract programme management roles. The data is trending along a consistent banding pattern though it is much spikier. This plot, reveals a distribution of candidates earning slightly less than the population who were registered last year with an average day rate of £625, which is down from £675, the maximum rate achieved being £1,500 per day.

The third plot line (red) shows the desired day rate at which the registering candidates indicated they would consider an offer of a contract. When this data is analysed further it would appear to formulate around a single point, namely £550 per day. Those candidates currently earning below this figure are still looking to push up their rates, whilst candidates currently (or previously) earning above this number are on the whole willing to accept significant day rate reductions in order to secure a contract. Again this would suggest tougher market conditions are driving down the “acceptable” charge rates for contracting programme managers. The PMBR this year should help identify if this is sector-driven, as the number of public sector opportunities have reduced.


PMO Managers and Support Staff

PMO Manager & Support - Salaries

Figure 5

The first line of data (blue) in Figure 5 above, plots the data collected for the 2011 PMBR (Project Management Benchmark Report) mapping the current salary of PMO and Support practitioners at the end of 2010 and shows the breadth of remuneration in this group.

The second plot line (gold) shows the distribution of current salary of the candidates registering for PMO and Support roles, which runs a close correlation to the PMBR data, recognising that the registration detail will also include those looking to enter this specialism at the support level. Support practitioners who have registered during the last year have an average salary of £26,651, which is down from £27,389. PMO Management practitioners, on the other hand, saw their average salary rise to £42,311, up from £39,741 last year.

The desired salary plot (red) for PMO and Support practitioners shows latent demand for a salary increase at the support levels, whilst the PMO management level is consistent across the three plotted data series.
 

PMO Manager & Support – Day Rates

Figure 6

In Figure 6 above, the first line of data (blue) plots the data collected for the 2011 PMBR (Project Management Benchmark Report) mapping the current day rate of PMO and Support practitioners at the end of 2010. As we can see there are 3 primary groupings in this data set against which we can reference the collected registration data.

The second plot line (gold) shows the distribution of current / last day rate of the candidates registering for PMO Management and Support roles. The data again shows three primary groupings, though they are trending left towards lower day rates and we have a lower level of activity amongst the higher rate earners. Looking into the registration data we can see that those registering for Programme & Project Support roles are averaging at £196 per day, whilst the PMO Managers return an average of £375 per day, both of which align to the PMBR data.

The third plot line (red) shows again the trend for practitioners at the lower day rates pushing aggressively for increases, whilst at the higher end of the scale we have practitioners willing to accept lower rates in order to secure roles. The PMBR should help identify a clearer picture of what has happened to actual rates during 2011.

John Thorpe is the Managing Director of Arras People and blogs for Arras People at How to Manage a Camel. His latest presentation on the PPM Marketplace can be found here.

Accreditations – Are They Worth Taking?

Words: John Thorpe

One of the most common questions we get from Programme and Project Management practitioners is with regards the value of taking accreditations in terms of securing a role.

In the current market, many Project Managers have hit mandatory requirement that they have Prince2® which rightly or wrongly has achieved the de facto standard for many employers and recruiters in the UK market and we have written many times on this subject. So to give a different spin on the question we have taken a look back at the Arras People Project Management Benchmark data to see if there is any correlation between accreditation and remuneration in the PPM marketplace here in the UK.

Looking back at the 2011 PMBR we discovered that a stunning 27.2% of respondents have no PPM accreditation, so the first question is: Does this impact the salary and day rates achieved compared to those who have invested their time and money?

Salary Distribution amongst all respondents in the 2011 PMBR - no accreditation versus all

Day rates for respondents to 2011 PMBR - no accreditation versus all

Well, as we can see in the graph to the left, the answer is Yes for practitioners who are salaried; those with accreditations are on the whole distributed at higher levels of remuneration across the £35 to £70K salary bands. We have 33% of those indicating no accreditation earning at below the £35K level and a residual hard core of those trading on experience alone still managing to earn more at the £70K+ levels.

As would be expected, the position is not as clear cut when it comes to those earning a living as a contractor. Here we can see that accredited practitioners fare better in the £250 to £550 per day range, though the un-accredited still appear to be unhindered through the £550 to £750 per day range. Above this day rate the overall distribution is even, though it would appear that those with accreditation are being valued.

If we look at this in terms of respondents who identified themselves as Project Managers we can see below the plots of salary and day rates for those with accreditation against those without. In the case of salary we see a very similar picture to the whole PPM plot, whilst for day rates there is a much steeper curve with lack of accreditation seemingly no barrier to earning capability.

Salary Distribution for Project Managers in the 2011 PMBR - with and without PPM accreditation Day rates for project managers from the 2011 PMBr - accredited versus non-accredited

Ok, so it would appear that on the whole accreditations do have an impact on the remuneration of programme and project management practitioners; so next we can have a look at the impact of the three most popular accreditations identified by our respondents to last year's survey. To recap the top 3 were;

  1. Prince2® from the APM Group with 51.7%
  2. MSP® (Managing Successful Programmes) from the APM Group with 13.5%
  3. APMP from the APM (Association for Project Management) 9.4%


Prince2®

PRINCE2 salaries versus all other respondent salaries from 2011 PMBR Salary distribution for PRINCE2 project managers and other project managers from 2011 PMBR

As we can see in the two graphs above, the Prince2® accreditation does have a positive impact on the PPM practitioner distribution by salary across the whole and also when reviewed for just Project Managers. As expected, because it is now a baseline accreditation the actual difference is not significant reflecting its "me too" position.

In terms of day rate, we can see in the two graphs below that the pattern is very similar for PPM Contractors across the whole community and also at the Project Manager level.

Prince2 accredited project practitioner salaries - 2011 PMBR Prince2 accredited Project Manager salaries - 2011 PMBR

 

MSP® (Managing Successful Programmes)

Salary distribution for MSP practitioners - 2011 PMBR Project Manager Salary Distribution for MSP practitioners - 2011 PMBR

As a more specialist accreditation aimed at practitioners involved in programme management, the MSP® accreditation shows a distinctly different salary distribution when compared to the general PPM population. The initial peak would suggest a grouping of those who have attained this accreditation as part of their development and are yet to develop into a more senior role whilst the majority (60%) are earning over £50K. The respondents identified as Project Managers who have attained this accreditation also show a higher remuneration level than their peer group.

In terms of day rate, we can see in the two graphs below that same effect, though it is magnified in terms of the day rates attained by contractors who have the MSP® accreditation against the general PPM population. In terms of the Project Management practitioners, the accreditation does not have such a significant impact on day rate achieved.

Day rates for MSP accredited respondents - 2011 PMBR Day rates for Project Managers with MSP Accreditation

 

APMP from the APM (Association for Project Management)

Salary distribution for APMP accreditation holders - from the 2011 PMBR Salary distribution for project managers with APMP accreditation, according to 2011 PMBR

As an accreditation, the APMP has a much lower profile in the UK marketplace with practitioners and clients alike, though it would appear to have a positive impact on remuneration. The graphs above showing salary distributions against the general PPM population and Project Managers both show a significant shift into higher levels of remuneration with the average salary moving by £10K.

When the APMP is considered in terms of day rates for contractors, we again see a marked difference from the general population with 52% in the £400 to £600 per day range compared to 39% for Prince2 and 38% for the group. In the Project Manager group the rate differential is not as marked today, but the data suggests that more junior PM’s have taken the APM accreditation which may push through to higher day rates over the coming years.

day rates for those with APMP accreditation - from the 2011 PMBR Day rates for Project Managers holding the APMP accreditation - from the 2011 PMBR

So in conclusion, it would appear that for most Programme and Project Management practitioners the reality is that accreditations are not only becoming increasingly mandated when looking for a new role, but more importantly they are also rewarded with higher salaries and day rates. There are senior practitioners who are still top of the pops today, able to trade on their wealth of knowledge and experience. But a new breed of practitioner will over time take their place at the table. A trend we will certainly look to track in forthcoming Arras People Benchmark reports.

John Thorpe is the Managing Director of Arras People and blogs for Arras People at How to Manage a Camel. His latest presentation on the PPM Marketplace can be found here.

Project Management Census 2015

Project Management Census 2015

2011: An Opportunity to Share Your Experience

Words: John Thorpe

For many Programme and Project Management practitioners in the UK, 2011 has been another challenging year, as predicted in last 2011 PMBR (Project Management Benchmark Report). Good news has been in short supply, as the UK economy felt the impact of Government policy to reduce the deficit as well as the uncertainties of the global economy, complete with continuing fears of a double dip recession and the ongoing troubles associated with the Euro.

The latest Labour market statistics from the ONS (Office of National Statistics) dated 12th October 2011 and covering the period June to August 2011 sets the tone:

  • The unemployment rate was 8.1 per cent and there were 2.57 million unemployed people.
  • The inactivity rate was 23.3 per cent, with 9.35 million inactive people aged from 16 to 64.
  • Total pay (including bonuses) rose by 2.8 per cent on a year earlier.
  • Regular pay (excluding bonuses) rose by 1.8 per cent on a year earlier.


More Opportunities

Whilst overall confidence at the macro level has been consistently reported as low, the good news is that at the micro level we have seen an overall increase in hiring activity in the PPM domain. At the end of October 2011, the number of new opportunities received here at Arras People is up at 123% of the comparable period 12 months ago, 155% if we look back 2 years. Whilst the increase in activity has been patchy and confidence is still fragile, it has been noticeable that private sector recruitment is certainly stronger. On the downside, public sector opportunities have all but disappeared, and compared to three years ago this increased level of activity still only represent 75% demand. More bad news has recently emerged from the REC1, who recently reported that the UK job market once again seems to have stalled, "brought about by hesitancy among clients due to the ongoing economic uncertainty."


The Change in average earnings by sectoral breakdowns, entire economy, and other denominations.Pay Challenges

Since the onset of these tough economic times we have continued to see winners and losers in the remuneration stakes across both permanent employees and contractors. Many employees have come to see frozen pay packets as an acceptable compromise for retaining a job, whilst others have been able to cash in by taking their skills and experience to new employers who are willing to pay a bounty to get them on board.

Many contractors have been hit by the triple whammy of reduced opportunity, reduced rates and internal competition as other contractors (their peers) reduce their rates in a quest to secure a paying role.

Added to all this the rate of inflation in October hit a high of 5.2% on the CPI (Consumer Price Index) and 5.6% on the RPI (Retail Price Index), which means that many programme and project management practitioners are worse off in real terms for another year.


Where is the Talent?

One feature of 2011 which we are sure to hear more about in 2012 is the creation, management, attraction and retention of PPM Talent. The current period of recession has seen a cut back in development opportunities for PPM practitioners as organisations have looked to reduce headcount and also risk. The reduced appetite for risk has seen organisations setting the bar high in terms of “must have” when looking to bring on both permanent and contract staff. Whereas in happier times the percentage fit was set at say 80%, we have seen clients demanding 95% before even considering a first interview as they look for demonstrable experience of having delivered "X" before!

Another common concern expressed by clients is the lack of availability of PPM Talent as they can't find the people they need. One major contributor to this position is the lack of "churn" in the job market or "fluidity", as practitioners stick with who or what they know (managing their own risk) rather than moving to a new role. General levels of unemployment make some organisations think there is lots of talent available and they fail to take the necessary steps to make themselves attractive or indeed the roles they have on offer.

Arras People 2012 Project Management Census
Share your Experiences

Arras People have launched the 2012 Project Management Benchmark Report and once again we need input from the PPM community. The annual survey is available now, click to take part

1 - October 2011 Report on Jobs from the Recruitment and Employment Confederation (REC) and KPMG.

John Thorpe is the Managing Director of Arras People and blogs for Arras People at How to Manage a Camel. His latest presentation on the PPM Marketplace can be found here.

Book Review - "Bid Writing for Project Managers"

Bid Writing for Project Managers

Author: David Cleden
Publisher: Gower
Size: 240 pages

Reviewed by Andy Budkiewicz

In the interests of transparency, I must admit that I have never been involved directly in commercial bidding for contracts. However, I have sat on the 'other side of the table' as a client project manager, assessing bids from a range of IT service providers. As such, this book review represented an excellent learning opportunity, enabling me to better understand the bid-writing process and how to respond robustly and effectively to client requirements. This is Cleden’s second book after Managing Project Uncertainty and he clearly draws upon his 25 years of working in public sector IT to provide this must read guide to conducting successful commercial bids.

The book begins with an excellent preface, which helps to set the tone and the style of writing, as well as the author’s own recommendations on how to get the most from the text. Written in the style of the internal dialogue that most people have when reading books on a niche subject matter, there is an engaging monologue of Q&A, helping to orientate the reader with the book’s key objectives and intended audience.

"So: Another book on project management?"

"Not really, Although this book is aimed at managers, particularly those with some experience of commercial projects…"

Whilst the content of the text is certainly comprehensive, the author also recognizes that busy project managers may want to dip into the book for specific guidance on aspects of the bid writing process. Indeed, the author recommends that those readers who are already engaged in bid writing can head straight to Chapter 4, which contains lots of practical tips and information to improve their bid.

Do I like this refreshing approach to text navigation? Yes, absolutely. It’s a great way to assist busy project management professionals as they cope with the many demands on their time.

By the way, I’m not simply advocating that you ignore the rest of the book, and simply head for Chapter 4. In fact, if you decide to read the book from cover to cover, you will be furnished with a sensible, comprehensive framework for the process of bid writing. The author (thankfully) does not focus on winning a bid for the sake of winning, but instead encourages bid-writers to follow a conceptual structure which focuses on the client’s needs, and considers how best to respond in a feasible and credible way. The intention is to construct a high quality, robust project framework which is realistic, and can be delivered effectively within agreed budgets and timescales. And we all know that this is the way to a satisfied customer’s heart.

For the £65 RRP (yes £65!) you get a book that recognizes and balances the art of bid writing with the science of bid writing. By the ‘art of bid writing,’ I mean the bid-writer’s ability to get under the skin of the client’s needs – what problem needs solving, and how can the bid and project proposals respond intelligently to those requirements? The 'science of bid writing' incorporates the tools and techniques that a bid team use to produce that winning bid - and this book provides many good examples. In particular, Chapter 4, Analysing the Requirements in Depth, should be required reading for all staff involved in project teams, not just bid writers, as it focuses on how best to dissect key themes to provide a comprehensive listing of implications, benefits to the client, assumptions, dependencies and the tangible evidence backing up the assertion. Likewise, the section on discriminators (elements of the bid unique to your organization) and differentiators (aspects of your bid which makes your bid stand out from competitors) are designed to give any bid that winning edge.

What’s particularly interesting to me is that whilst bid-writers are clearly the core, intended audience of Cleden’s work, and the content would certainly support existing bid-writing professionals or teams to re-think or improve their approach, it seems to me that this text is equally relevant to project management professionals who regularly undertake procurement exercises for such services. Cleden’s work enables professionals working on both sides of the fence to better understand what constitutes a quality bid.

This book is a standout example promoting best practice in the bid proposal process. Reflecting on some of the bids I have received from prospective vendors, it’s clear to me that if more commercial companies started using some of the approaches advocated by this book, then we would avoid a situation where vendors over-promise and woefully under-deliver. And, gone too would be the vendor approach of bidding low to win the contract and then relying on change control to charge for ‘new requirements’ or ‘scope creep,’ resulting in final projects costs which far exceed those proposed by other vendors with more comprehensive bids. 

In future editions of this book, it would be helpful for the author to focus on some of the emerging trends in commercial service offerings such as Software as a Service (SaaS) which will affect the bid-writing approach. There is a growing trend for service providers to offer standard platforms to companies with minimal or no customizations allowed – an approach which needs to be handled carefully, so that the benefits - as opposed to the limitations - are effectively communicated and understood by the client

The title of the text certainly does what it says on the tin, and whilst the book’s design does little to attract a readership, it is clear that the content is underpinned by the author’s extensive knowledge and experience in effective bid writing. And in my book, substance always wins over style. In summary, this book is a vital resource for serious bid-writers which is likely to make a significant impact on the overall quality of any future bid writing ventures.

This book is available from the Gower website at a discount to Arras People/Camel/Tipoffs readers.

ABOUT THE REVIEWER: Andy Budkiewicz is a PMP and PRINCE2 certified project manager with a decade of project management experience in a Fortune 500 pharmaceutical company Global IT PMO, delivering application and Infrastructure projects. Follow him on Twitter @Andybud; or LinkedIn; or visit his blog 'The Project Manager's Guide To The Universe'

DO YOU WANT TO REVIEW A BOOK FOR TIPOFFS? Contact us today.

Q&A

"I can point to the value I've added to companies through my work and have a demonstrable track record of on time, on scope, on budget project delivery. How do I convey to superiors or new hiring personnel that I'm worth more than I'm making?"
 – Alistair, Chichester
 

Steve Trippier

Steve Trippier of Arras People says: Well Alistair, I imagine this is a question that most of us have asked at some stage in our career.

As Project Managers we maybe feel that having a track record of delivering on time, to scope and on budget is ”the ideal” and is what all employers look for in a CV. But is this the case in reality, and what added value can a future employer actually glean from those sorts of projects?

For this particular question I think it may help to put yourself in the shoes of a prospective employer for a moment and then ask yourself the question: "How is this person going to be able to contribute and add value to my organisation?".

As an employer would you see someone who has apparently never faced adversity in the projects they have delivered as an experienced and rounded project manager? Or would you maybe prefer to see someone that has experienced the sort of difficulties we have all faced at one time or another where, for example maybe the funding has dried up and we have had to be creative with the available resource in order to achieve the successful delivery? Or maybe one particular element of the project has severely impacted the critical path. This necessitated some rather delicate, but ultimately successful, discussions with the Project Sponsors and key stakeholders around the reasons for the project falling behind schedule and the mitigation taken.

On reflection these are probably the sort of "war stories" that, if properly relayed, will add value to your CV and show any prospective employers that you are indeed an experienced Project Manager that is potentially worth that little bit more than someone who hasn't had the opportunity to face, and overcome, such obstacles.

I believe that adding value and proving your worth (or even a little more than your current worth!) is maybe more about being able to deliver under adversity, being creative and finding ways around the obstacles that as Project Managers we face in our day-to-day roles.

I hope that answers your question Alistair, and gives you more options to explore when looking to prove your worth.

If you would like to put a question to Steve or any of our other project management consultants, contact us and it could end up in a future edition of the Tipoffs Q&A. Also, be sure to check out both our Project Management Careers Clinic and also the Project Management Careers Advice pages for more advice related to project management careers.

Got a question for us? Contact us today.

Social Media Roundup

Various Related Subjects Around the Web


From Arras People & How to Manage a Camel


Websites


Podcasts & Vodcasts

Arras on Twitter

Training Providers

CAMEL: Is MoV New Buzzword?

CUPE Projects, proud sponsor of Project Management Tipoffs

Management of Value (MoV) has evolved from over 50 years of value engineering, to form the missing link in developing successful IT and Change Management projects. A method developed primarily within the manufacturing and construction sectors, MoV is a best practice standard from APMG to management across a broad spectrum of sectors. David Roberts from Arras People's Training Directory sponsor CUPE Projects offers insight into the relevancy of MoV to modern project management in a blog post for How to Manage a Camel.
 

Software Providers

Previous Editions of Tipoffs

Project Management Tipoffs Archive

Agile Project Management - October 2011

"Agile" project management? Or is it "agile" project management? Methodology or philosophy? We shed light on both these and many others questions concerning Agile's foray into the project management community.
 

Higher Education & Project Management - September 2011

Arras People introduces the Higher Education Directory and delves into the largely unexplored, possibility-laden world of university courses and degree packages now on offer for project managers.


Differentiating in the PM Marketplace
- August 2011

Arras People looks at holiday time and how thoughts about making a change in your career shouldn't be idly tossed away. We show you how to make the most of it, and introduce our Differentiate Yourself series of webpages from a recent slideshow presentation.
 

Stakeholders and Project Politics - July 2011

Arras People looks at stakeholder management issues as they pertain to the project management community, serving as a watch dog for the 5W-How about the people most affected by the projects you manage.


Career Development - June 2011

Arras People wants project managers to continue their professional development - this edition of Tipoffs intends to show you how, and what tools are at your disposal.


Comparing the Public & Private Sector - May 2011

Arras People checks out the current affairs and issues being faced by those within the two main sectors of employment for PPM - the public and the private sector.
 

Workplace Challenges - April 2011

Arras People peruses the Benchmark Report and solicits the general PPM public about the workplace issues and challenges we still face in a supposedly more inclusionary society.

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